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aeon_wall_art_maori_fishscale_NZ001

Contemporary Maori wall art. Fishscale. Aotearoa - New Zealand wall hanger from rimu veneer

Contemporary Maori wall art. Fishscale. Aotearoa - New Zealand wall hanger from rimu veneer
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Contemporary Maori wall art. Fishscale. Art from rimu veneer
US$41.14
incl GST
Qty.
Contemporary Maori wall art: fishscale
Aotearoa - New Zealand wall art


Contemporary Maori wall art, crafted from rimu veneerboard, striking and beautifully simple wall art panels portraying Maori kowhaiwhai designs. We feature 'heart',  'scroll', 'fishscale' and 'rafter'. 
 
  • size: 170mmx300mmx10mm (6.69"x11.81"x0.39')
Kowhaiwhai
This term is used to describe an artform typically used by Maori to adorn the rafters (heke) of their meeting house's (wharenui). The designs generally comprise repetitive symmetrical patterns and are predominantly based on the shape of the unfurling fern frond (koru). Kowhaiwhai were traditionally painted using three colours; red, white and black. Red represented warmth, blood and life, white represented purity and hope for the future and black represented the earth.

The patterns varied tribally and thus regionally throughout New Zealand (Aotearoa).  The patterns are often ascribed meanings based on the shape they emulate eg shark fin = to fight with power and strength, fish scale = to protect or shield, canoe (waka) cutting waves = resolve, strength of purpose.

The symmetry of the designs and their visual balance are often regarded as a reflection of the principles of balance in Maori life. I.e Light – dark, male – female, good – bad, earth – sky, life – death.
Because of their placement and association within the meeting house (wharenui), kowhaiwhai are intrinsically linked to their ancestors. The story of succeeding generations told through the subtle permutations of line and curve. Some suggest that kowhaiwhai were an early form of writing, whereby the various shapes acted as memory markers to trigger recollections of past events or individuals.


This term is used to describe an artform typically used by Maori to adorn the rafters (heke) of their meeting house's (wharenui). The designs generally comprise repetitive symmetrical patterns and are predominantly based on the shape of the unfurling fern frond (koru).
Kowhaiwhai were traditionally painted using three colours; red, white and black. Red represented warmth, blood and life, white represented purity and hope for the future and black represented the earth.

The patterns varied tribally and thus regionally throughout New Zealand (Aotearoa).  The patterns are often ascribed meanings based on the shape they emulate eg shark fin = to fight with power and strength, fish scale = to protect or shield, canoe (waka) cutting waves = resolve, strength of purpose.

The symmetry of the designs and their visual balance are often regarded as a reflection of the principles of balance in Maori life. I.e Light – dark, male – female, good – bad, earth – sky, life – death.

Because of their placement and association within the meeting house (wharenui), kowhaiwhai are intrinsically linked to their ancestors. The story of succeeding generations told through the subtle permutations of line and curve. Some suggest that kowhaiwhai were an early form of writing, whereby the various shapes acted as memory markers to trigger recollections of past events or individuals.

New Zealand Native Rimu
The Majestic Rimu can be found throughout New Zealand. Mature specimens grow to a height of over 60m (200ft) & up to 1000 yrs of age. Heart Rimu with a red/brown grain is one of the most beautifully figured woods in the world. A growing scarcity, fuelled by felling bans and ravenous demand has made Rimu a highly sought after and prized decorative timber. This product is made from recycled NZ Rimu.

Bamboo
Bamboo is found throughout the world, it is one of the most sustainable and renewable plants on the planet. A form of Bamboo called Spike Sedge (Kuta), like Flax (Harakeke) had many uses and was used by Maori to make soft hats, mats and baskets (Kete). 

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Aotearoa.co.nz is a New Zealand online gallery of art and craft, and online gift shop. Owned and operated by Goina Thedinga, who lives in Devonport: a historic seaside suburb on a peninsula, just across from downtown Auckland. 

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